My mom (who's 65) recently experienced an episode -- I'm not sure how else to describe it. She was disconnected with reality, laughing, making some repetitive motions (straightening her hair) and highly irrational.

She was still vaguely coherent -- she laughed at our concern and alarm at our behavior. She was able to eat breakfast normally, and then went to take a nap. After her nap, she was back to normal.

She's had a similar episode a few years ago: highly irrational behavior, manic laughing, even slight delusions.

I'm not sure what this is and how to get her treatment for it.

Thanks.



Answers


bella
1365 days ago
Hi Samantha - sorry to hear of these episodes with your mother. Would you say except for these 2 incidents, that she's otherwise well?? Let me ask a few questions - has she confided in any past abuse as a child? Does she recall the episodes after? Sometimes medications can cause temporary psychosis, so I would take a look at her meds. I think your mom should tell her doctor about this.



Chemar
1365 days ago
I think the only way to know what may be causing this is for her to have a complete evaluation at the doctor and be sure that one of you is with her to be certain that the doctor is informed about both of these episodes



NOC
1365 days ago
Man, I am very sorry this happened to your mother. However, I believe I have the solution to your problems. I believe this is psychosis and I heard that it can prevent one from normal function and caring for one'self. You need to go get a Psychological evaluation for your mother and find out if this is it. The methods of treatment include Anti-psychotics, mood stabilizers, and tranquilizers. Anti-psychotics are generally very helpful, and group or individual therapy has proven to be useful. Matter of fact, I suggest reading about this disorder right at this very own website.



Chemar
1365 days ago
I think we need to be careful about trying to give a finite dx here NOC

Two brief episodes, years apart may be related to something else and really needs a professional evaluation of this lady to determine what may be causing this...for example, I know of a similar manifestation that was actually related to a brain tumor. So honestly, only a physician examining the patient, getting a full medical history and evaluating relevant tests can arrive at a dx